CiF Watch prompts correction to ‘Comment is Free’ claim on Gaza rocket attacks

On July 21st we demonstrated that ‘Comment is Free’ contributor Giles Fraser made a significant error when purporting to cite the number of rockets fired into Israel from Gaza during ‘Operation Pillar of Defense’ in November.

Fraser’s post - a relatively interesting meditation on both the efficacy and spiritual dimension of Western missile (and missile defense) systems – included this passage:

These days, bitachon doesn’t so much mean the Lord Almighty. It means Iron Dome, the missile defence system, designed to intercept rocket attacks on Israel. During operation Pillar of Defence,in 2012, during which Hamas fired over 100 rockets from Gaza into Israel, Iron Dome was seen to have been about 85% successful. The technology is impressive and is set to get even more so. Iron Dome is a game-changer.

As we noted in our original post, however, while during the first 24 hours of the war roughly 100 rockets were fired into Israel, during the entire eight-day conflict, which ended on Nov. 22, Hamas and other Palestinian terror groups launched approximately 1,500 rockets at Israel.

We contacted Guardian editors, alerting them to the error, and, last night, the passage was revised to accurately note that the number cited (100) represented the rockets fired only during the first 24 hours of the war.  The Guardian wrote the following in the correction section of the paper:

revised

 

We commend Guardian editors on the prompt correction.

Guardian story includes egregious undercount of Hamas rocket attacks

‘Comment is Free’ contributor Giles Fraser penned an essay on July 19th addressing both the efficacy and spiritual dimension of Western missile (and missile defense) systems – using, as basis for his meditation, a new British government review of possible replacements for the Trident system, but focusing primarily on Israel’s Iron Dome, and the state’s reliance on such weapons for their citizens’ security.

Fraser

(The theme and title of his essay is derived from the Hebrew word bitachon, the root of which, batach, means to lean or rest on someone or something, as in “to trust in God”: “It is better to trust in God than to trust in any man” – Psalms 118:9).

Interestingly, while making a case against what he suggests is an over-reliance on such weaponry (‘faith in princes’ which he juxtaposes with the biblically rooted trust in G-d), he makes a significant error when purporting to cite the number of rockets fired at Israel from Gaza during Operation Pillar of Defense’ in November.

Fraser writes, thus:

These days, bitachon doesn’t so much mean the Lord Almighty. It means Iron Dome, the missile defence system, designed to intercept rocket attacks on Israel. During operation Pillar of Defence,in 2012, during which Hamas fired over 100 rockets from Gaza into Israel, Iron Dome was seen to have been about 85% successful. The technology is impressive and is set to get even more so. Iron Dome is a game-changer.

However, while during the first 24 hours of the war roughly 100 rockets were fired into Israel, during the course of the entire eight-day conflict which ended on Nov. 22, Hamas and other Palestinian armed groups launched approximately 1,500 rockets at Israel.

Screen-shot-2012-11-21-at-10.14.38-PM

Graph courtesy of Times of Israel

We will be seeking a correction to Fraser’s 15-fold undercount of deadly projectiles fired at Israeli civilians during that period.  

Guardian ‘Live Blog’ on Gaza accuses IDF of “chest thumping” over killing of Hamas terror chief

The Guardian’s ‘Live Blog’ on the conflict in Gaza is titled ‘Hamas: killing of military chief by Israel has ‘opened gates of hell’ – live‘.

The blog, edited by Paul Owen and Tom McCarthy, noted (at around 21:00 Israeli time) that they were following the Twitter feeds of both the IDF and the Hamas military (Al-Qassam Brigades).

About 30 minutes later they posted the following about an IDF Tweet regarding their targeted killing, earlier in the day, of Hamas terror chief Ahmed Jabari.

Taunts? Chest thumping?

The Guardian’s pithy characterization of the exchange would lead you to believe the Islamist terror movement and the Jewish state were involved in some sort of schoolyard scuffle.

Thus far, the Guardian hasn’t seen fit to post this video of the following “taunt” of Israeli “rats” by Jabari:

The end result of the IDF action in Gaza today was that – sadly for some – Jabari will never get the chance for his own “chest thumping” over the liberation of Jerusalem, Haifa, and Tel Aviv.