Guardian reports on UK terror plot ignore facts regarding potential Jewish targets

A Guardian report on Feb. 21, Three would-be suicide bombers found guilty of terror plot, by Sandra Laville, the paper’s crime correspondent, began thus:

Three would-be suicide bombers have been convicted of plotting to carry out terror attacks in the UK which would have been more deadly than the 7/7 bombings in 2005.

The three men, Irfan Naseer, Irfan Khalid and Ashik Ali, Laville explained, were key figures in a Birmingham-based terror cell which planned to detonate multiple suicide bombs which, according to prosecutors, could have caused “death and injury on a scale greater than the 7/7 bombings”.

Irfan Naseer, Irfan Khalid and Ashik Ali

Irfan Naseer, Irfan Khalid and Ashik Ali

All of the three convicted men had ued online material from Inspire, “a self-help guide produced by Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP)”, while two of the men had visited Al Qaeda training camps in North Waziristan.

Laville actually published three separate reports (and over 3000 words) on Feb. 21 at the Guardian on the terror plot, but one piece of information wasn’t available: any details on the targets the three had selected.  

Here’s what Laville wrote in one of her reports:

Although no target was ever discussed, their ambition was to outdo the bombers from the 7 July 2005 attacks in London. Naseer told his associates the plan was for “seven or eight [bombs] in different places with timers on at the same time, boom, boom, boom”

Interestingly, however, as the CST and other media, including the Telegraph, reported today, the three had indeed mentioned Jewish institutions as one of their possible targets.

Tom Whitehead, the Teleraph’s Security Editor, noted,  in a Feb. 21 report, that the British jury in the terror case heard how Naseer justified attacking non-believers because they “act like animals”.  Whitehead added the following:

Conversations between them and others were secretly recorded by the police. 

In one Naseer…talks about other methods of killing people he was taught about while allegedly undergoing terror training in Pakistan.

He said: “Make it and put it inside like, you know like Vaseline or cream like that, like Nivea cream and put it on people’s cars.

“You know like the door handles on a whole, imagine putting it on whole like area innit overnight and when they come in the morning to work they start touching the, they open the door and then five minutes they die man, all of them start dying and that, kill about 1,000 people.”

He added: “Even if we can’t make a bomb, get guns yeah from the black geezers, Africans and charge in some like synagogue or charge in different places.”

The CST noted that this latest terror conviction represents the third recent case in which Islamist terrorists have targeted British Jews.

The Guardian’s curious omission is not insignificant, as the targeting of Jews worldwide is clearly part of Al Qaeda’s strategy.  

A cache of evidence found on the body of  slain Al Qaeda terrorist Fazul Abdullah Mohammed, killed by Somalian forces in 2011, noted the need to inspire young Muslims to initiate attacks against Jews in the UK, and included one document with the following instructions:

 “Our objectives are to strike London with low-cost operations that would cause a heavy blow amongst the hierarchy and Jewish communities.

The document also outlined specific plans to attack the Stamford Hill and Golders Green neighborhoods in London, areas in which, the terror group chillingly noted, “tens of thousands of Jews” are “crammed in a small area.”

It’s curious, to say the least, that the Guardian reporter covering the terror plot, by self-radicalized Brits intent on causing mass casualties in the UK, evidently didn’t find it of interest to note that one particular often-targeted religious community was again singled out by the Jihadists for murder. 

Guardian dance critic praises Batsheva’s ‘effective nursery of talent’ AND declares Gaza ‘occupied’

Deca Dance by Batsheva Ensemble. 

I admit it. I know nothing about dance.

I don’t know how to dance, nor how to ‘fisk’ an artistic criticism of a modern dance performance.

In fact I think it’s fair to say that I know as little about the art of moving rhythmically to music, using prescribed or improvised steps and gestures, as Guardian dance critics know about the political contours of the Middle East.

Thirty-four of the ninety-two words in ‘s review of a Birmingham performance by the Israeli dance company Batsheva (Guardian, This Week in Dance, Nov. 10) dealt with the Israeli-Conflict. Or, more specifically, more than one-third of Mackrell’s piece focused on the West Bank and Gaza.

Here’s her “review”.

While I was unable to locate any evidence that Naharin made such a comment about Gaza – and, in fact, the characterization of the territory as “occupied” has been rejected by Hamas leaders themselves - the larger issue is why a Guardian correspondent specializing in artistic criticism feels compelled to examine the political beliefs of the director of an Israeli cultural institution.

It’s as if, for those on the Guardian Left, all Israelis, from all walks of life, now require a sort of moral exoneration by journalists – those routinely bowing to the cult of ‘Palestinian Solidarity’ – if they are to be admitted into the international cultural community.

The BDS movement against Israel is as marginal as it is unsuccessful, and whatever political capital it possesses is due merely to the acquiescence by the radical chic clique of political and cultural posers to its malign agenda.